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02/06/2018

Comments

Marek Runowski

Hi Eric! Thank you for your excellent and very interesting article about teaching movement and rhythm patterns to young children. I agree with everything you wrote and will use some of your wonderful ideas and suggestions in my work. I would like to ask you some questions though as I am not sure I understood everything well. I understand and agree that teaching labels to children 1-7 yo is too early. Movement (and context) is more important then patterns itself - which are second important. Gordon said that movement is the most elementary level of instruction when we teach Rhythm Learning Sequence of formal audiation. When we teach preparatory audiation it must be the same. My questions are:
1. You said you always ask children individually to sing for you certain beat functions. Is it possible at all to do it with such young children? Do they keep steady beat motion or it doesn't matter at this stage? I teach children from 7 yo up and many of them can't keep staedy beat movements. But I guess you ask only to repeat singing without the proper movement coordination...
2. You didn't mention divisions/elongations patterns in your list. Do you sing them too?
3. Gordon said that an up-beat function is the most difficult. You said that the rest funtion is the most difficult. Why do you think so?
4. Do you have any video examples of your mevement exercises you do with youn children? There is so little of good examples available. Even Music Play DVD doesn't have much. I would appreciate it very much if I could watch them.
5. I like your idea of acculturating children to such variety of styles in rhythm. Do you use CD recordings to do it? If yes, what kind? Could you give me some examples of the good rhythmic recordings you use with children of this age?
Again, thank you very much for your wonderful article and great ideas. Best, Marek Runowski

Dr. RizzRazz

1. You said you always ask children individually to sing for you certain beat functions. Is it possible at all to do it with such young children? Do they keep steady beat motion or it doesn't matter at this stage? I teach children from 7 yo up and many of them can't keep staedy beat movements. But I guess you ask only to repeat singing without the proper movement coordination…

**It's more than possible. It's necessary. Chant simple two beat patterns to the unborn. They're absorbing. Never too early. They don't have to respond at all. I just give them a chance. I have 1 year olds imitating on occasion. I'm not looking for assimilation or audiation, or I am, but it's never expected. You are looking at this through the eyes of formal instruction. Informal guidance and instruction do not necessarily have any expectations on the children. They can do what they want. They are always perfect in preparatory audiation.

2. You didn't mention divisions/elongations patterns in your list. Do you sing them too?

**Not when there's a possibility of them imitating. The divisions and elongations make it next to impossible for them to imitate. Those more difficult patterns forces them into absorption.

3. Gordon said that an up-beat function is the most difficult. You said that the rest funtion is the most difficult. Why do you think so?

**I disagree with Gordon. My students in imitation or assimilation often speed up over rest patterns. They won't audiate a full macro beat or longer without speeding up. On the other hand, I have 2 year olds that will do pickup patterns. Certainly by 3 or 4, but I've seen it earlier.

4. Do you have any video examples of your mevement exercises you do with youn children?

**Yes. I'll send a link. There's expressive movement and then there's rhythmic coordination. This is rhythmic coordination, but mostly just trying to get them to create patterns on their own in PreK. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiC1zg4mv3U&index=29&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E

First time doing RPs individually.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dY0hh9dQi8&index=30&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kfqSOKVqhY&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E&index=31
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nTmPXQPMUo&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E&index=32
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqRY2jtZbuE&list=PL227DDC0E472E518E&index=33

Leads to reading like this by 2nd grade:
https://youtu.be/XOq48z0p7uk

5. I like your idea of acculturating children to such variety of styles in rhythm. Do you use CD recordings to do it? If yes, what kind? Could you give me some examples of the good rhythmic recordings you use with children of this age?

**My Spotify playlists: http://bit.ly/DrEric1
DrEric2, 3, 4, 5

These are for expressive movement.
https://youtu.be/m8em1F4RU7w
https://youtu.be/toekwmEYARk

**My Spotify playlists: http://bit.ly/DrEric1
http://bit.ly/DrEric2
http://bit.ly/DrEric3
http://bit.ly/DrEric4
http://bit.ly/DrEric5

Enjoy!

Marek Runowski

Eric, thank you very much for your wonderful and detailed answer. I don't have any more questions for now.

Marek Runowski

Eric, I've watched the rhythm exercises clips on YT. These are amazing materials. I've learned a lot just from watching them. What do you think, what makes these kids move? They seem to be unable not to move. Is it the way you chant and your voice or maybe the patterns itself? There is a lot of groove and drive in your singing that may encourage them to move. Don't you think? And I believe the idea is to move them first so then they have some context to repeat or improvise the patterns. Thank you again. I appreciate everything you do! Best, Marek

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